10 May 2014

Get Out of Australia Hamed Sepawi

We don't want crooks like Hamed Sepawi in Australia. Cousin of multi-billionaire 'Governor' Taib Mahmud of Sarawak, Sepawi and the Taib Cartel drained an astronomical amount of wealth out of Sarawak on the island of Borneo and directed it into their own bank accounts and global business interests. This is 'money laundering' on a huge scale.

Above. Crony capitalist Hamed Sepawi with ex-Forestry Tasmania boss Evan Rolley. Rolley signed the contracts that gave Ta Ann access to young native forest trees while Rolley was CEO of Forestry Tasmania. Now Rolley runs the Ta Ann operation for Sepawi. He also sells wine to Ta Ann from his vineyard while the Australian taxpayer pours money into Ta Ann. The use of immature trees has effectively destroyed the Tasmanian saw mill industry into the future. The Australian government just wasted another $7.5 million tax-dollars on Ta Ann which is building a plywood mill, although it claims to have never operated at a profit. Ta Ann is just a small part of the Sarawak Cartel's transnational catalogue of assets. The Taib Cartel routinely avoid paying tax in Malaysia.

The strange relationship of corruption between Sarawak and Tasmania can be understood if one remembers Britain transported 75,000 convicts to Tasmania in the 19th century. Due to the fact Tasmania is an island, the descendants of those convicts are still there.  Sarawak is built on corruption in one of the most corrupt regions on Earth. The Taib Cartel has systematically stolen from the state for 25 years. Sarawak is controlled by an Islamic minority that incorporates Sharia Law into Sarawak's legal system. The co-operation of these Moslem free-loaders and the descendants of British convicts is truly bizarre.
Read more. Evan Rolley sells wine to Ta Ann even though he manages the company and it's propped-up by the Australian taxpayer.

From the Mercury

Struggling timber company Ta Ann Tasmania bought $136,800 worth of wine from its executive dir­ector Evan Rolley in 2013 — the same year that the company received $20.3 million under the Tasmanian Forests Agreement.
The federal government payment came after Ta Ann surrendered 108,000 cubic
metres of peeler billets from its contracted 265,000 cubic metres.
The annual report shows the company would have recorded a $12 million loss in 2013 but for the federal government compensation payment.
In November 2012 Mr Rolley described the company as being on a “knife edge’’ and threatened that the company could shut its Tasmanian operations because of parliamentary delays in the signing of the forest agreement.
The Malaysian-owned company’s Tasmanian subsidiary bought the wine from Mr Rolley’s Heriots Point Wines vineyard at Castle Forbes Bay, south of Hobart.
Mr Rolley when he was Forestry Tasmania chief executive, fronting a hearing with the then premier Paul Lennon. Source: News Limited
Mr Rolley said the wine sale was completely separate to the terms of his employment contract.
Mr Rolley when he was Forestry Tasmania chief executive, fronting a hearing with the then
He denied a suggestion from the Sunday Tasmanian that the purchase was akin to a success fee.
Ta Ann Tasmania general manager Robert Yong said the company purchased the wine quite appropriately and arranged a special company labelled bottling.
“The price also included freight, storage and insurance requirements for cellaring,’’ he said.
“The wine will be held for a number of years and will be used progressively at a range of company special functions and events for employees and customers.’’
Mr Rolley said the price for the pinot noir was about $35 a bottle — indicating a purchase of about 300 cases.
Mr Rolley, 61, became executive director of Ta Ann Tasmania in March 2012 as the company was the target of an environmental campaign during TFA negotiations. He took a key role in advocating Ta Ann’s case and pushing for the forest agreement.
When the agreement was signed last June Ta Ann was promised $26 million as compensation for agreeing to surrender the resource.
The following month Ta Ann was promised $7.5 million towards a $15 million plywood mill project at Smithton under the Labor Government’s jobs and growth plan.
Ta Ann operates mills at Lonnavale and Smithton and employs 82 people — down from 134 in 2011.
Ta Ann’s report says that the remaining federal government funds ($5.7m) will be acknowledged in its accounts once there is reasonable assurance the company will get the funds.
The latest report reveals that Ta Ann’s total current liabilities exceed assets by $17.8 million.
Ta Ann recorded a $10.2 million loss in 2012.

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